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>>> on the broadcast tonight, closing in on gadhafi. there's talk of u.s. military options against him. and now for hordes of people, now's the time to get out of there. >>> a collision course in wisconsin with time running out. tonight, is there a deal to end the standoff? >>> america at the crossroads. all week long our reports here on america's changing economy. tonight, are we keeping up in the search for the next big thing? >>> and the winner is -- the good, the bad and the ugly at this year's oscars. and the amazing story behind the man behind the best picture. and the amazing story behind the man behind the best picture. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the situation in libya is now a lot more serious where the u.s. is concerned. u.s. navy ships are being readied for a number of possible options here including possibly enforcing a no-fly zone. moammar gadhafi spoke again today on two television networks an interview the u.s. immediately called delusional. all this time the forces against him are closing in. we begin t
.msnbc.com. >> thanks for having me on last hour. >>> thanks to you for staying with us for the next hour. this is the u.s. navy ship buil 1969. the uss mount whitney is a big command and control ship which essentially means it can oversee relyomexpetis at the mita iinlv i it was deployed to haiti, for example, in 1994 as the united states played a roll in ousting the military hunta that had taken over that country. eoiallia, hen john mccain said a alongside the georgians? it was the uss whitney deployed that georgia n part it went to. that's considered to be the most advanced command and control ship that the united states has ever floated. it is where the u.s. has bn running the libyan war out of. between the admiral and a u.s. army general, this is where they've been running the war in libya from. as of last night, the uss mount whitney we think is not going to be the headquarters for the libyan war. that war effort will now be run by nato. the no-fly zone part of it and the bombing gadhafi's ground troops part of it which they call something like protecting civilians. this ship named after the highest
for the next hour. this is the u.s. navy ship built in newport news, virginia, in 1969. the uss mount whitney is a big command and control ship which essentially means it can oversee really complex operations that the military is involved in. it was deployed to haiti, for example, in 1994 as the united states played a roll in ousting the military hunta that had taken over that country. remember when john mccain said today we are all georgians, when russia and the nation of georgia were having a war, and john mccain wanted us to start fighting russia alongside the georgians? it was the uss whitney deployed to bring humanitarian aid. it was the first ship to reach that georgia n part it went to. that's considered to be the most advanced command and control ship that the united states has ever floated. it is where the u.s. has been running the libyan war out of. between the admiral and a u.s. army general, this is where they've been running the war in libya from. as of last night, the uss mount whitney we think is not going to be the headquarters for the libyan war. that war effort will now be r
republican candidate mike huckabee is confused about where the current president grew up. but first, the u.s. is closer to the crisis in libya. tonight two u.s. warships are heading for the waters off libya although for now he says it's not to fight. >> we'll be enter the mediterranean shortly. it will provide us a capability for both emergency evacuations. >> moammar gadhafi is trying as hard as he can to hold onto power. pro-gadhafi troops tried and failed to retake a town neurotripoli currently under rebel control. and one of gadhafi's sons tells cnn the government is trying to talk with the rebels, but the rebel leadership is in chaos. let's start with cnn's international correspondent, ben wedeman, who is in rebel-held city benghazi. the former libyan interior minister says the noose is tightening around gadhafi's neck. tell us where have you gone and what have you seen? >> we headed sort of in the direction of tripoli. what we've seen is that the noose isn't necessarily tightening around gadhafi's neck. it's clear the opposition is in firm control of this part of the country, but if yo
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
radiation in the vicinity posed no immediate danger. but she added japan was considering asking the u.s. military for assistance. the nuclear emergency has forced the evacuation of more than 400,000 people. those in the affected area lineup for hours for drinking water, food, and other essential goods. most of remained, in the face of enormous hardship and confusing news -- confusing news. now some are growing anxious. >> i am extremely uneasy. information is so complex, and i cannot make any decisions by myself. i am really confused. >> emergency officials are checking people at shelters who fled the affected area for higher levels of radiation. but levels so far are of little concern, as is limited radioactivity directed in drinking water in the fukushima area. >> the japanese emperor has expressed his deep concern about the nuclear crisis. in a rare address to the nation, he called on the japanese people to reach out and help each other in this time of national suffering. in the disaster areas in the country's northeast, hundreds of thousands of people are still facing shortages of f
are willing to die for him, says the u.s. will face a bloody war if they intervene. bill: jonathan hunt, live at the libyan-tunisian border, hello there. >> reporter: good morning to you. colonel gadhafi appears to be as defiant as ever this morning. in a speech to his people, marking the 34th anniversary of the peoples' congress and in front of what appears to be a hand-picked audience, he said that he and his supporters will, quote, fight to the last man and to the last woman. he railed against intervention, warning the united states and others not to troy to intervene in the situation in libya. he says he and his people -- [inaudible] >> [broken speech] >> he is building -- he is fire up supporters by implying this is all an international plot to oust him. meanwhile he says al-qaeda is prompting some of the violence against him. >> [inaudible] >> -- united states and al-qaeda combined, but this is the reality world in which colonel gadhafi appears to live right now. there is also violence in several cities right now. the pro ga-- >> [broken speech] >> here on the border we still have a gro
into their cause. that is half of their active force. the united states involved in a big way, as well. the u.s.a. ronald -- u.s.s. ronald reagan and 20 rescue missions were run and choppers from there. six were in operation, rescue operations. you name it. at the end, it all comes to down to the japanese people. again in small coastal town we watched you might see a boat behind me. there were boats, there were trucks, there were cars lining the streets upside-down swept by the tsunami which had hit here on friday. most of those were taken away by the end of the day, very determined people, indeed. >> gregg: earthquake in japan hitting very close to home. many japanese-americans trying to get in touch with their loved ones. one community on the west coast springing into action to help victims. casey stegall is live in little tokyo section of los angeles. >> reporter: a lot of people don't know this but 300,000 japanese-americans call the state of california home. that is the largest population in all of the united states. little tokyo, a neighborhood back here behind me in downtown los angeles,
a crew member of the u.s. fighter that crashed in libya. defense secretary gates testified at a congressional hearing. gates said he does not think the u.s. should arm those rebels. >> in terms of providing that training, in terms of providing assistance to them, frankly there are many countries that can do that. that's not a unique capability for the united states. and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> libya's foreign minister has defected to britain. musa kusa one of gadhafi's closest aides. he is suspects of masterminding the bombing of pan am flight 103 that killed 270 people. nbc news pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski joins me now. nato officially took control of the entire military mission in libya but the headline is about the cia operatives on the ground and what they are doing there. what can you tell juice u.s. military and intelligence officials say if they didn't, if the obama administration did not have cia operatives on the ground, this operation was not well thought out and would be in trouble. this is pretty much preforma in thi
's forces are surrounding the rebels. how involved should the u.s. get? >> gregg: new details now on a major nuclear scare in japan. japanese officials say radioactivity levels very close to the nuclear plant have gone down in the last several hours. this plant facing a potentially disastrous meltdown after an explosion this morning. take a look at these incredible pictures, clouds of smoke rising from up the reactor area. safety officials are scrambling to contain the damage and evacuating 140,000 people in a 12-mile perimeter. adam housley is streaming live with the latest north of tokyo? >> we're about 20 miles from where we were earlier this morning, 70 miles north and to the eat of tokyo, halfway to where the reactors are. the location we are at southern end of where the tsunami came through here. pictures waf been seen the last few days, you can see some of the destruction. car next to me was carried down the street. there is a car over on the distance that was up on the top of fence. in this was a power structure and some sort of a banner that was hanging across the intersection. in t
community is tightening the noose around gadhafi. the u.s. says all options are on the table. meanwhile gadhafi is striking back in force. they attacked rebel troops in the two major cities closest to the capital using tanks and anti-aircraft guns. overnight government troops tried to retake zawiya, but rebel troops held their ground. >> reporter: as the blood shed in libya moves into another day, the tone in washington has turned decidedly sharper. the white house is now clearly ratcheting up the pressure on gadhafi to step down. troops loyal to moammar gadhafi are fighting to take back territory now in rebel hands. amateur video captured this firefight between pro and anti-government forces in libya's third largest city. the uprising that began last month poses the biggest threat yet to gadhafi, his bloody crackdown has reportedly left hundreds, possibly thousands, dead. still, in an interview with christianne amanpour of abc news gadhafi laughed off calls for him to step down and denied using force against his own people. >> they love me all my people with me. they love me all. >> bu
regime launches air strikes in eastern libya as it battles to regain control. two u.s. soldiers are killed in a shooting at frankfurt airport. german interior minister thomas de maiziere takes the defense portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we begin in libya, where gaddafi has threatened to start a war if the u.s. or nato intervenes in the unrest. speaking at a political rally, gaddafi says thousands of libyans could be killed if foreign powers and to the country. member is in the suez canal are heading toward libya as the u.s. and u.n. high pressure on the regime. forces loyal to gaddafi launched air strikes on a rebel- controlled town in the east of the country. >> dozens of seriously injured rebel soldiers have been admitted to this hospital. pro-gaddafi forces have launched air strikes on the city. the libyan leader attempts to recapture lost territory in the east of the country. inhabitants are fleeing the battles. there were intense clashes further west, in the oil port held by the rebels. gaddafi is striki
the president is being hypocritical because several union workers have negotiating program. we'll analyze. u.s. warships are going to the libyan coast and liberal wants troops to go into that country, wow! >> you borrow my brain for five seconds, can't handle it. >> bill: is it wrong for the media to exploit charlie sheen. does he have a strong legal case against cbs. >> wow, did what does that mean. by winning? >> bill: caution you are about to enter the no-spin zone. factor begins right now. >> bill: thanks for watching us tonight. the drama in wisconsin is still no winner, that is the subject of the talking points memo. americans are caught up in important conflict, cost cutting versus union benefits. 37% of americans favor cutting pay for public union employees but 56% oppose that. the "new york times" headlines reads majority in poll back employees in public sector. but the poll is misleading because 20% of the responds say they are from union households. if you subtract them, those that favor cutting benefits win the poll. wow, "new york times" -- however according to new poll, 42% want
to a defiant moammar gadhafi as u.s. warships head toward the region. we'll go live for the latest on the deadly violence and speak about what's next. >>> ultimatum. a new cbs news poll find the majority of americans back union workers in the ongoing budget battles as governor walker threatens layoffs if democrats don't come back to work today. we're live in wisconsin. >>> and flood fears. after heavy rains and torptds pound parts of the midwest, floodwaters rise to dangerous levels and the worst is yet to come. early this tuesday morning march come. early this tuesday morning march 1st, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to the "early show" here on a tuesday morning, march 1st. >> nice to have you back. hard to believe it's already march. the year is flying by. go want to get you started with the revolution in libya and the very latest there. the u.s. is trying on increase pressure on moammar gadhafi sending warships and aircraft to the region. meantime billions in libya's foreign assets have now been frozen and overnight rebels held off a prolonged attack by pro gadhafi f
. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's
nations estimates more than 1,000 people have died. libya's oil chief says production is cut in half. u.s. consumers are feeling the pinch. food prices in january rose the fastest they have since 2008. oil topped 100 dollars a barrel yesterday. gas is up 20 cents a gallon just this week alone. >> it's killing us. we don't go anywhere but work and home. >> we could see gasoline between 4 and $5 a gallon by memorial day, maybe sooner. >> in washington, federal reserve chairman bernanke says through tough economic recovery it is speeding up higher oil prices could be a huge threat. >>> most of the south continues dealing with the after effects of torrential downpours, one state is dealing with wild fires. >>> we will head down to florida where the fires burn house of acres. >>> and parts of one make city shut down after falling ice from the frigid weather results in multiple injuries. details coming up when "good morning maryland" returns. [ male announcer ] this is charlie whose morning flight to london starts with arthritis pain... and a choice. take tylenol now, and maybe up to 8 in a day
in mlyangi. >> stock tock closed down over there six percent. >> u.s. naval forces are moving away from japan over fears of troops exposed to dangerous radiation particularly on the uss regan. >> rescue relief remains top priority but thousands of people are evacuated near the fukushima nuclear plant. if you look at it. second hydrogen explosion to rock the plant and the massive cloud of smoke is carrying radioactive conitalination and that is a concern for the u.s. naval ship providing humanitarian assistance. that affects uss ronald reagan a hundred miles from the plant. they detected low levels of radiation and prompted the ship to move further out to sea. in fact, the commander of the fleet. vice admiral, reveals that the ships are being temporarily repositioned and aircraft away from the fukushima dutch nuclear plant. it goes on to report that sensative units were conducted. 17 crew members were exposed to low level activity in the mission and the radio activity was removed from the affected crew by washing with soap and water and no further contamination was detected so far. >> so what
democrats in a bit. also, the head of the u.s. intelligence says gadhafi not likely to back downytime soon. we're going to go live to nic robertson on the ground in libya shortly. >>> we're all over the controversial hearing in washington on how some muslims in america are being radicalized. congressman peter king called for the hearing and will be joining me in a couple minutes. i want to begin with a story that you are outraged by just as much as i am. i'm talking about that little girl in tiny cleveland, texas, told they are principal she was gang raped. now her town has been rocked by these allegations that 18 men and schoolboys possibly more here, assaulted this 11-year-old child. a child. think about that for a moment. the suspects 18 of them range in age from middle schoolers all the way up to a 27-year-old. some of them allegedly recorded this gang rape on their cell phones. and they spread it around school. court documents paint a brutal picture as to what happened as one young man after another forced that sixth grade girl into hours of sex. but the defense says the girl is not c
or airplanes. he stressed the u.s. is diplomatically supporting the no-fly zone, not the enforcement itself. no american troops on the ground, no american planes, no enforcement itself, that's what we know. what we don't know is a lot bigger. joining us now, eugene robinson, pulitzer prize winning columnist for "the washington post." thanks for being here. >> good evening, chris. >> what do you make of president obama's remarks on libya today? are we now at war? was that the communication? even coming away from it, i had a hard time answering that question for myself. >> when i heard the president's speech, i thought gee, we might be, and here is why. he said very clearly that as far as he's concerned and the united states is concerned, gadhafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. he forfeited the right to be president of libya, and he set these demands, gadhafi has to stop, he has to withdraw, these are not negotiable and there will be consequences. so that to me says we are going to use force to make gadhafi do what we want him to do. >> and of course, if he doesn't do what we want him to do,
, the search for answers in one of the deadliest bus crashes in u.s. history. >> clayton: >> rick: and new challenges for a devastated japan. reports of mass evacuations from the area surrounding a nuclear power plant. as an explosion destroys a building that houses a reactor. and we get reports that some time of emergency at a second reactor in the same complex as japan is rocked moments ago by another aftershock, this one, measuring 6.3, 80 miles from the nuclear plant. greg palkot is streaming live from japan. greg? >> reporter: we are about 75 miles north of tokyo. and here on this sunday morning, people here are beginning to come to grips with the crisis, with the catastrophe that hit this part of the country. around me we can see cars, boats, trucks, that have been thrown around by the tsunami wave that reached inland from this port city, also, we have been seeing as we have been traveling around the country, the effect of the earthquake itself. cracks in roads, and buildings damaged, as well. and, the death toll, rick, continues to climb and officially put between 1300 to 1700 and,
after that interview with western journalists at a seaside restaurant in tripoli, u.s. diplomats quickly suggested that gadhafi has become unhinged. >> and when he can laugh and talk into american and international journalists while he is slaughtering his own people, it only underscores how unfit he is to lead and how disconnected he is from reality. >> tripoli has an air of normalcy about it, if you can say that. traffic is on the streets. many stores are open again, but one protesters tells cnn that the lull does not mean that the fight to bring down gadhafi is over. >> people have been afraid and have been living under his tyrannical regime for too long. we have reached the point of no return. too much blood has been shed and too many people have been injured for this regime. >>> venezuelan president hugo chavez is chiming in on libya. he says that the united states is exaggerating and distorting the situation in libya to justify an invasion. >>> well, there will be dire consequences that could include layoffs. now, that is according to wisconsin governor scott walker. walker plans to
. should the u.s. intervene? and national public radio shoots itself in the foot again. >> let me say at the outset we are putting this program together on friday as we are getting the details on the earthquake and tsunami in japan. we do not have a lot to add other than modern science and technology has allowed scientists on the west coast and in hawaii to warn residents that the tsunami was coming. as always, the u.s. navy is ready to respond to events in the pacific with the military relief. the program is called "inside wash.." let me begin in washington. it has been a long while since congressional hearings have brought up so much publicity, much of it negative. this one was about homegrown terrorism with emphasis on home run muslims. ever since he announced the hearings, peter king has been accused of being a latter-day joan mcnerney, but he refused to back down. >> to back them would be an abdication of what i believe should be the main responsibility of this committee, to protect america from a terrorist attack. >> when you assign their violent actions to the entire community,
with european and nato officials. >> brown: so, should the west, should the u.s intervene in libya? we join that debate with two people who've wrestled with similar questions as director of policy planning at the state department. richard haass held that position in the george w. bush administration. he's now president of the council on foreign relations. his latest book is, "war of necessity, war of choice: a memoir of two iraq wars." anne-marie slaughter worked in the obama administration state department until earlier this year. she's now professor of politics and international affairs at princeton university. anne-marie slaughter, i'll start with you. we've heard some of those fighting against qaddafi calling for outside help, specifically a no-fly zone. what's the chief argument for helping them >> the strongest argument for helping them is stwra t.j. i can which is that we've finally seen a major shift in the theirty of the entire middle east from anti-americanism and anti-israel and focused, really, outside to an indigenous demand for democratic government, for accountable government
's commitment to the cease-fire. it was originally a french-sponsored resolution, french and the brits. the u.s. got on board yesterday and it passed and now the president is being criticized and defended by both parties. it's not breaking down along ideological lines and there are a lot of concerns about whether the united states can afford this effort, whether this turns into nation-building, whether the president needed to go to the congress to get permission to do this and he, himself, may have suggested when he was a candidate what the president of the united states would do in a situation like this and whether the u.s. can sit back and not do anything in terms of getting involved in this battle, as we have been for weeks. some of the questions examined during today's show. in the meantime, another fox news alert. major developments in the battle over union rights and the budget in wisconsin. a judge has just temporarily blocked a new state law from taking effect. he's issued a temporary restraining order saying it will not go into effect. that law was hard fought over in wisconsin and eli
like. john rundle is a seismologist with u.s. berkeley. john, thank you. 7.9, that is huge. what you can tell us? as far as, you know, the after effects. mainly, that's the tsunamiy that they are looking at now, right. >> reporter: that's a major earthquake. 7.9. these things occur about once every couple, three years on earth so they can do great damage if they are near a populated area, particularly if they occur in a trench and if they are shallow, like this one is near japan. they can cause major tsunamis and destruction. and in fact, it might be larger than that. i having something theor that ss it's an 8.8. but i don't believe that. that's kind of big. that's as big as the chilean earthquake. >> are you looking at these pictures as we are looking at them? judging by the damage, you said you were hearing 8.8 and you don't believe that can be true. can you look at damage and tell by looking at it how strong it might have been? >> reporter: i could if i had the ability to. i am in santa fe, new mexico, i am going to the santa fe institute tomorrow to discuss issues of risk and so
as a place to wash. >>> a new warning today for americans overseas. the state department is urging u.s. citizens not to travel to yemen. for those already there, officials say they should consider leaving now. let's bring in nbc news white house correspondent mike viqueira. good sunday morning to you, mike. >> good morning, alex. >> what's the latest that's prompting this warning? >> there are terrorist warnings, terrorist unrest, civil attacks in yemen. yemen an impoverished country strategically located on the arabian peninsula. they've had a man in power there for 32 years, president ali abdullah saleh. this unrest has been happening for the past couple months, corresponding to the unrest in egypt. you'll recall that president saleh said, okay, he tried to launch a preemptive political strike, said i will not seek a eternal at the end of his current term in 2013, won't install my son at that time. for a while it appeared that might hold. now it appears the situation is deteriorating rapidly. adding to the complicated factor in yemen is the presence of al qaeda on the arabian peninsu
. and 107 of the strikes today were by the u.s. look at nato stepping up. the rebels are now closing in on what had been a strategic and symbolic stronghold of libyan troops. the city of sirte. it's one of the biggest obstacles on the road to the libyan capital. rebels pushed about 150 miles westward over the weekend. that's significant progress, amid reports that allied forces continue to hammer gadhafi. fighter jets struck a military command about six miling outside the capital. and u.s. forces are now using precision strike aircraft. the aircraft are used in tight targeting situations such as cities, to hit the enemy while avoiding civilian casualties. that's beginning to sound a little diceyer. in just over two days, rebels have taken the key oil towns of brega and benjawad. they have assured the world's oil markets that they will start selling oils themselves. first off, the president got the multilateralism he said was an important part of his foreign policy. the united nations and arab league are still onboard. check. we avoided what appears to be imminent massacres in rebel h
, the prevailing winds kind of push it out to sea. well, it just turns out that eight u.s. warships that were part of the relief operation were in that path. some of the choppers have been flying through and apparently were exposed to some radioactivity. we're told 17 sailors, i believe, flight crew members were exposed. they were simply washed down, which is actually one of the things you do when you've been exposed to radioactive, they wash down. and again, the commander of the ship says that it was a very low level, they're not particularly concerned, but they have moved those eight vessels to an area that's not -- no longer downwind of any radioactive plume. >> lester, let me ask you a question. i don't know if you know this, having gotten there, but where are the people? like the people that escaped from the tsunami, didn't get washed out, but don't have homes anymore? i know it's cold out there, i know they haven't had food and water for a long time. where's the government putting them? >> reporter: they're being put in shelters and schools in some cases. we noted when we were driving in her
the u.s. and afghan governments agree that the u.s. military should remain in the country after the planned 2014 end of combat operations to help train and advise afghan forces. >>> hold on, not so fast. a wisconsin state senator is denying a report that democrats are ready to come out of exile and end their nearly three-week union rights standoff with republican governor scott walker. "washington post" reporter ezra klein has been closely following the story. we were reading this headline this morning for "the wall street journal," democrats to end union standoff. but on the flip side, senator larson from that same state saying no, that's not true. what are you hearing and how might they gracefully, shall we say, come to a compromise? >> yeah, i think we can say opinions differ on the standoff right now. i think you're seeing the beginnings of an end game here. the democrats are admitting they can't do this forever. they want something report. they have dramatically weakened walker and there's a recall effort against a number of state senators. walker is down to 40% in the poll
with this fox news alert, st. louis police are confirming now that a suspect who is believed to have shot u.s. marshals is dead. meantime, the two deputy u.s. marshals and one task force officer who were shot and wounded are recovering at a hospital nearby, we're told at least one of the marshals is in critical condition, the other in fair condition. you've been watching this throughout the morning on "america's newsroom". the marshals and the other task force officer went to a house in the st. louis area, to try to apprehend this suspect. a gun fight broke out. the two marshals and the other officer were hit. but the suspect, again, is reported to be deceased. we will keep you updated on "happening now". jenna: another fox news alert, new numbers out on the decifit. last month we what's the biggest monthly decifit in our history, a record $223 billion in february, that's according to the nonpartisan cbo. it's the 29th consecutive month that the government is operating in the red. if you add up all the debt, by the way, when you add all of that, we had to spend $21 billion of our money just t
and the latest there. the u.s. is trying to increase pressure on moammar gadhafi sending warships and aircraft to the region. in the meantime, billions of libyan assets have been frozen and overnight rebels held off a long attack by pro-gadhafi forces outside tripoli. mandy clark has more for us this morning. mandy, hello. >> reporter: hello. international pressure is building as the world looks at the situation here. libyan assets have been frozen. new sanctions are being considered. and there are even discussions of imposing a no-fly zone over libyan air space. gadhafi laughed at suggestions that his people want him out. >> they love me. all of my people with me, they love me all. they will die to protect me and my people. >> reporter: yesterday, we saw firsthand in a city they raging up tensions which is in the hands of the rebels and gadhafi's stronghold to the west. we arrived shortly after government planes are bombed nearby weapons depot and found the local militia scrambling to load anti-aircraft guns. down the road, we found other men guarding a major oil terminal. the facility itself
was arrested and carried feet first into the senate chambers by police. in that case where the u.s. constitution prevailed, there were no state borders for him to hide behind. >> brett: florida supreme court upheld republican governor's scott's decision to reject federal funding for a high speed rail project. the plan would have left taxpayers liable for billions in cost overruns. transportation department says it's evaluating option forgiving the $2.5 billion to other states. >>> president obama is attending a pair of fund-raisers in miami. mike emanuel tells us more. >> reporter: president obama joined former governor jeb bush to put the spotlight on education reform. miami central high school is considered a poster child for fixing schools. >> for outstanding teachers and principals, a common mission, a culture of high expectations, that is what it takes to turn a school around. >> reporter: they give jeb bush for his reform efforts including public and private school choice greater trans and accountability and better pay for better teachers. but in difficult fiscal times, the n
launches. i think it's an unnecessary and unacceptable risk for the u.s. i think the u.s. could support this with intelligence. as well as logistics. but i don't want to see u.s. aircraft involved in a no-fly zone. >> judge napolitano: walid, should the president of the united states ask you for his advice about whether any military assistance would work, having just heard what the general said and respecting him as i know you do, what would you tell the president? >> the best thing is not to involve any of our assets if we can. but time is not on our side. in the sense that what is happening in the opposition area is where i'm concerned. not really what gaddafi is doing. gaddafi could be taken out by either the united states or the europeans no doubt about that. but i'm afraid that the radical element will slowly creep in to the area of the command and soon we will have libya under gaddafi and maybe libya under a radical at the end of the day. it's a hard strategic choice to make. >> judge napolitano: last question, what do you think will happen? as things now stand, is he crazy enough
. the presidential election of 2012 will be about the economy and leadership, signature issues and the "u.s.a. today." just 52% of americans now believe president obama is a strong and decisive leader. that is down 21 points since he took office. 47% of americans say the president is not a strong leader. new rasmussen poll out today says 23% of likely voters rate the response to libya add good or excellent. 30% giving him poor marks. there is no question president t obama's leadership is in question but why? if you analyze independent americans you see a common theme emerging. many ideological people simply do thought know what mr. obama thinks of his country. dolls he believe we have an exceptional nation as he said the other night? or does he think we have an unjust society? certainly obama care and other liberal programs he champions are designed to redistribute wealth to those who have not prospered in our capitalistic system. how does mr. obama really see america? now, i can't answer that question with any certainty. the issue first came up with the reverend wright controversy. mr. obama's long
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